goodcharlotteofficial:

redbloodedamerica:

mallninjacode:

pual1010:

brownglucose:

stunningpicture:

So proud of my mother for doing her own research after I sent her that meme. A sign she hung in her car window.

Stay woke

Is this true?

Not only is it true, it gets worse. The Susan G Komen For The Cure Foundation has actually successfully sued “competing” charities, because (paraphrasing) their “message or branding was infringing.”
You read that correctly: they took money that people had donated to cure cancer, and hired attorneys with it, to sue ANOTHER group of people trying to find a cure for cancer, who, in turn, had to use their donated money to hire their own legal counsel to defend themselves.



There’s a documentary about this on Netflix called Pink Ribbons, Inc. if anyone’s interested.

goodcharlotteofficial:

redbloodedamerica:

mallninjacode:

pual1010:

brownglucose:

stunningpicture:

So proud of my mother for doing her own research after I sent her that meme. A sign she hung in her car window.

Stay woke

Is this true?

Not only is it true, it gets worse. The Susan G Komen For The Cure Foundation has actually successfully sued “competing” charities, because (paraphrasing) their “message or branding was infringing.”

You read that correctly: they took money that people had donated to cure cancer, and hired attorneys with it, to sue ANOTHER group of people trying to find a cure for cancer, who, in turn, had to use their donated money to hire their own legal counsel to defend themselves.

There’s a documentary about this on Netflix called Pink Ribbons, Inc. if anyone’s interested.

reblogged 4 hours ago @ 19 Oct 2014 with 282,274 notes via/source

Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers - “I’m Gonna Build On That Shore”

Still on my Sam Cooke kick, because it’s really nice background music for when I’m at work. But this album is a lot more gospel/blues influenced, which I really like, and it’s also complementary to the music featured in Follow Me Down: Portraits of Louisiana Prison Musicians, which was just great. A simple but touching and sensory-filled documentary about the ways music is used and performed by inmates of three Louisiana prisons. I’ve also learned that gospel or hymns have a 60% chance of making me cry.

posted 2 days ago @ 17 Oct 2014
xmusic xsam cooke xsam cooke and the soul stirrers xi'm gonna build on that shore

Sam Cooke - “I’ll Come Running Back To You”

The inspiration to the past week’s soundtrack, the one and only.

posted 3 days ago @ 16 Oct 2014
xmusic xsam cooke xi'll come running back to you
reblogged 3 days ago @ 16 Oct 2014 with 2 notes via/source
xphotography xchadcrumrine

The way violence, or the threat of violence, turns human relations into mathematics… [i]s the ultimate source of the moral confusion that seems to float around everything surrounding the topic of debt. The resulting dilemmas appear to be as old as civilization itself. We can observe the process in the very earliest records from ancient Mesopotamia; it finds its first philosophical expression in the Vedas, reappears in endless forms throughout recorded history, and still lies underneath the essential fabric of our institutions today—state and market, our most basic conceptions of the nature of freedom, morality, sociality—all of which have been shaped by a history of war, conquest, and slavery in ways we’re no longer capable of even perceiving because we can no longer imagine things any other way.

» David Graeber, Debt: The First 5,000 Years (14)  
posted 4 days ago @ 15 Oct 2014 with 4 notes
xquote xbook xdavid graeber xdebt xdebt: the first 5000 years xhistory xanthropology

So. Tonight Kevin sat down with me, had me do a stream of consciousness on this monster book (The Great Transformation) and took notes on what I said to help me organize my thoughts. And the notes he took are cool because it’s almost a transcription, so it’s kinda fun to re-visit how I talked this through/to remember this nice thing he did with me.

  1. Premise: How the book is about…um…how it’s talking about the processes that kind of happened to…to have the primary economic ordering/institution be a self-regulating market. And how that in turn not only dominates the economic spheres, but also the political and social structures.
  2. So he sees this as a terrible thing. As kind of the reason behind why mankind faces a crisis in the forties, during World War II.
  3. I mean the thing that kind of came about that I’m not sure about after the discussion is whether a self-regulating market has ever been implicated. Even though the effects of the market society are in place. A lot of the social consequences have been felt, but I think something from his work that lots of people draw on is…well…the question I have is: I’m still not sure if there ever has been a self-regulating market in place.
  4. There’s this concept of protectionism is kind of a tricky thing. Even though there is a self-regulating market system, because it necessarily degrades a lot of social relationships and as a necessity creates…it just depletes resources inherently. There isn’t a mechanism for providing for people who for whatever reason are left out of the system, or for accounting for waste, or for checking itself. Growth and profit became the only goals of this economic system, that turned into an ideological mindset.
  5. So his thing with society protecting itself is tricky. First, it’s hard to say on what level society comes forward to protect itself. He speaks as if society is a single unit. And I think also he sees the main acting body in that sense as the state, who is there to intervene. But now, it’s not that simple (bring in article: civic groups, philanthropy, NGOs, extra actors who step in where economy and political bodies fail to address social ills). Second, if society has this mechanism to keep resisting these different stages of having a self-regulating market in place. There’s these different check points along the way that offer resistance that call into question the actual existence of any self-regulating market, and for how long did it exist. Is self-regulating market an end goal? Or is it a constant ebb and flow? The double movement that he talks about. Is the double movement always going to exist? Or will the self-regulating market ever override it?
Why history? Early on he says that the best way to understand the point to which society has gotten is to look at society from a macro perspective and circumscribe these big main institutions. (The market is one institution.) The history of these institutions provides the path to the crisis that society is in. What is the crisis? He says that if the self-regulating market were to exist for a sustained period of time it would lead to the physical destruction of man and nature. Mankind is facing this crisis. “The greatest crisis that man has ever faced.”
  1. Do you buy it? Yes. But it’s hard to place his argument historically. It’s hard to figure out this idea of protection. At which point does the protection mechanism either fail or become insufficient to curb this self-regulating market trajectory?
  2. I think the crisis is extended. I realize that neoliberalism is the extension of economic liberalism Polanyi talks about alongside the development of market society. This kind of development that justifies an economic hegemony. That is, one that justifies actions that are profit and growth driven. But that have adverse effects by creating poverty, displacement, dispossession of land, environmental degradation.
Protection mechanisms. Responses to poor people on the part of the state, like the institution of welfare.
  1. Considering the trajectory we’re in now, in which that economy has only become more dominant even as different countries gained independent, there’s almost no other alternative for countries who want to participate in the global poverty. And even with generating wealth on the level that’s possible in the economy.
  2. The permeation of the market’s effects on society in terms of adverse effects. Consequences. They’ve only become more entrenched, ingrained. Which raises the question of whether one side of the double movement (the market economy side) has actually just gained traction, and become more formidable over the years. Even though there are all these difference responses, difference responses put in place to try and counter it (in the US, like state programs or initiatives…welfare programs, state education funding) have been struggling. Struggling to maintain funding, and have to keep justifying themselves. The market economy can only keep growing.
So I think that, I’m not exactly sure how to fully relate the book to what’s going on today as well as I thought I did. It’s been tripping me up. The more I think about it the more messy it is, or the more I don’t understand it. Another thing that I like about it though is the tracing the development of institutions, and I like the explanation of how rising forms of thought justify the institutions. The institutions gain a logic based whichever discourses proliferate at their production. You couldn’t have the implementation without a shift in the way people thought about it.
posted 2 weeks ago @ 05 Oct 2014
xpersonal

Where does this paralyzing sedation come from? This ebb and flow of sadness, this dull weight of fear? When did I become so easily deflatable? The past few days have been a little rough around the edges. “Fake it until you become it” is just what I need to suck up and do, finally, because I do have deadlines to meet. It’s ok it’s ok it’s ok it’s ok

Me: Sam, what do you do when you have heavy boots?
Sam: First eat a little piece of chocolate
Sam: Sometimes it’s actually dementors

posted 2 weeks ago @ 05 Oct 2014 with 2 notes
xpersonal

loveinliverpool:

This is the song I’ve waited my whole life to hear.

reblogged 2 weeks ago @ 05 Oct 2014 with 1 note via/source
xmusic xhamilton leithauser xthe silent orchestra

thechanelmuse:

"You write in order to change the world, knowing perfectly well that you probably can’t, but also knowing that literature is indispensable to the world. The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way people look at reality, then you can change it." —James Baldwin

"Writing is really a way of thinking—not just feeling but thinking about things that are disparate, unresolved, mysterious, problematic or just sweet.” —Toni Morrison

"The purpose of any piece of writing is its existence before a reader’s eyes. A writer exists when she fills the blank page. A writer fulfills her task when she can be read by readers. The important thing is to write." —Nancy Morejón

"The ability to use language to effective ends, to have somebody read something and see it, or for somebody to paint an entire landscape of visual imagery with just sheets of words—that’s magical." — Yasiin Bey (Mos Def)

"By and large, the critics and readers gave me an affirmed sense of my identity as a writer. You might know this within yourself, but to have it affirmed by others is of utmost importance. Writing is, after all, a form of communication." —Ralph Ellison

"The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart." —Maya Angelou

reblogged 2 weeks ago @ 03 Oct 2014 with 8,225 notes via/source
xquote xwisdom xwriting xmaya angelou xralph ellison xyasiin bey xmos def xnancy morejon xtoni morrison xjames baldwin
reblogged 2 weeks ago @ 03 Oct 2014 with 1,681 notes via/source
xgpoy xhair xphotograph xportrait

kanyes-wife:

every scene from this show is on tumblr

reblogged 2 weeks ago @ 02 Oct 2014 with 231,244 notes via/source
xparks and rec xtv xcomedy

luxvriously:

My anaconda will consider it

reblogged 2 weeks ago @ 02 Oct 2014 with 472,455 notes via/source
xyes

Stiglitz’s anecdote indicates that the U.S. state plays a critical coordinating role and that the typical U.S. firm is highly dependent on state action. In fact, the U.S. model of capitalism is built around a core of highly protected and state-dependent industries that are very far removed from any hint of economic liberalism. The key industries in this core include the defense firms, agribusiness compaies that are heavily dependent on government subsidies, the big oil companies that are tightly intertwined with U.S. foreign policy, the large pharmaceutical firms that depend on government-financed research and the enforcement of patent monopolies, and finally, the large financial firms—giant banks, brokerage firms, and insurance companies—all of whom are supported by regularory structures and a highly favorable system of taxation. Arguably, the category should also include much of the telecommunication industry and the largest entertainment firms that own much of the broadcast and cable television apparatus.

» Fred Block, “Understanding the diverging trajectories of the United States and Western Europe: A neo-Polanyian analysis” (2007)  
posted 2 weeks ago @ 01 Oct 2014
xfred block xsociology xmarket economy xkarl polanyi xscholarly article xquote

An all too narrow conception of interest must in effect lead to a warped version of social and political history, and no purely monetary definition of interests can leave room for that vital need for social protection, the representation of which commonly falls to the persons in charge of the general interests of the community—under modern conditions, the governments of the day. Precisely because not the economic but the social interests of different cross sections of the population were threatened by the market, persons belonging to various economic strata unconsciously joined forces to meet the danger.

» Karl Polanyi, “The Great Transformation” (1944). This book is a doozy.  
posted 3 weeks ago @ 28 Sep 2014 with 1 note
xKarl polanyi xthe great transformation xquote xbook

Labor markets, in short, are politically structured institutions in which the relative power of the participants is shaped by legal institutions that grant or deny certain baskets of rights to employers and employees. And this, in turn, generates an ongoing process of political contestation to shape and reshape these ground rules to improve the relative position of the different actors. Employers often use the rhetoric of “market freedom” to push for policies that strip employees of rights, but this is not disembedding [i.e. freeing the labor market from being impacted by legal, cultural, and political institutions]. It is rather an attempt to embed the labor market in political and legal rules that are more favorable to employers.

» Fred Block, “Understanding the diverging trajectories of the United States and Western Europe: A neo-Polanyian analysis” (2007)  
posted 3 weeks ago @ 27 Sep 2014 with 1 note
xFred block xquote xKarl polanyi xlabor market xthe great transformation